Last edited by Zolojar
Monday, July 27, 2020 | History

8 edition of THE STANDARD... Because weve always done it that way here! found in the catalog.

THE STANDARD... Because weve always done it that way here!

by Marianne E. Olson

  • 370 Want to read
  • 8 Currently reading

Published by Planning Innovations .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Business & Economics / Structural Adjustment,
  • Business,
  • Health care planning,
  • Leadership,
  • Organizational change,
  • Strategic Planning,
  • Business & Economics / Leadership

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages334
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8532662M
    ISBN 100966251202
    ISBN 109780966251203
    OCLC/WorldCa40115587

    Always, Done, Way, Wrong, You. Quotes to Explore We must reject the idea that every time a law's broken, society is guilty rather than the lawbreaker. It is time to restore the American precept that each individual is accountable for his actions. Ronald Reagan. Time Society Law Broken.   A streamlined business is one that is constantly assessing itself and ensuring its operations are under control. If you are doing something, it should be because it supports your business goals, and not simply because that’s they way it has always been done. More posts on Operations Management topics.

    "Because We've Always Done it This way" The Nails in Your Organizational Coffin An excellent book and video is the resource is "Who The most important thing to grasp here is that you are. So the statement, “But we’ve always done it this way,” should be looked at as an opportunity for education and discussion rather than an announcement that the person is not open to change. If the person is approached properly it can lead to a better relationship and hopefully to .

      One of the proposals in front of the assembly was to direct the investment managers to divest their fossil fuel holdings. The proposal had widespread support, but when it came down to it, the measure failed. Not because of it's merits, but because of politics. That's not the way they've always done it and they were afraid of the implications.   However, we all know that the “that’s the way we’ve always done it” argument is flawed. Risk has a frequency component to it. So something can be done multiple times without incident, perhaps due to nothing more than luck, but the risk can still be high.


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THE STANDARD... Because weve always done it that way here! by Marianne E. Olson Download PDF EPUB FB2

THE STANDARD "Because we've always done it that way here!", is the root cause for mediocrity being an acceptable performance outcome for the professional and non-professional health care worker.

THE STANDARD "Because we've always done it that way here!", has a documented pattern of crisis intervention. Decision-making is a response to a Author: Marianne E. Olson. Because that's the way it's always been done around here.

__ Now of course, this study is supposed to be a metaphor for humans. We live in times of complex structures, both organizational and political. And in many cases, we justify specific behavior with: "It's always been done that way.".

“Because we’ve always done it that way” is a major factor in current state blindness – not only because the steps that an organisation are taking can be out of date, but because the very resistance to change leads to a fear of looking under the hood to see what problems may exist.

Many people say that the phrase “This is how we’ve always done it” contains the seven most expensive words in business. And, in many cases, that’s true. We know that past success is no guarantee for the future, especially when the only constant is change.

But, that doesn’t stop many workplaces from being completely resistant to new ideas. They love to say, ‘We’ve always done it this way.’ I try to fight that. That’s why I have a clock on my wall that runs counter-clockwise.” In a book presenting an historical perspective on the use of information technology in libraries used a quotation from Hopper as a chapter epigraph.

In response to the consultant’s question about why something is done, one of the more surprising things to hear from educated, highly competent people is, “We’ve always done it that way.” They simply cannot explain the rationale – they only know that it.

The standard response is: “we’ve always done that way” That has been problem for many years CHECK OUT THIS POEM written in. I once asked a manufacturing company why they end their financial year in March – after much scratching of heads it turns out they used to process sugar and that was the end of the cane season.

Michael Reardon, Ph.D., is the Senior Principal consultant for the Business Consulting Services team at Blackbaud where he leads the change management practice and has more than 20 years of experience in organizational communication, change management, virtual work, and corporate to joining the Blackbaud team, Michael worked as an Assistant Professor in the.

Getting past “We've always done it this way” is crucial. Evidence-based practice (EBP), a problem-solving approach to patient care that integrates the best evidence from well-designed studies with clinicians' expertise, patient assessments, and patients' own preferences, leads to better, safer care; better outcomes; and lower health care costs.

As the first of three articles (first published in and now shared here for a wider audience) that seek to explore a few of the issues around what some midwives call the WADI (‘we’ve always done it that way’), syndrome, this one looks at some of the advantages and.

2. It’s working the way it is. Leave it alone. Can we go now. Despite what you were told, this is not a democracy.

We don’t care about your ideas. Just do what you are told to do. And do it the way that you are told to do it. When you try to change things you will hear the response “But we’ve always done it this way.”. So, the next time you are handed a spec and told we have always done it that way and wonder what horse's ass came up with that, you may be exactly right, because the Imperial Roman war chariots were made just wide enough to accommodate the back ends of two war horses.

Now, here. It's called This Is How It Always Is, and it's a story that's close to Frankel's heart because she's living it: Her own child was born a boy and now identifies as a girl.

That's where the. Because That’s The Way We’ve Always Done It. by Ron Feher “It’s like deja-vu all over again.” ~Yogi Berra. T here’s an old story about a man who is watching his wife make pot roast for dinner.

As he’s watching, his wife prepares the meat and then just before she puts it into the pot for roasting, she cuts off both ends of the meat. Examples include eliminating the centralized nursing station and implementing new technology that changes the world at warp speed, such as robotics.

Such dramatic changes can be good, and many come about through innovation. These changes take us from “We’ve always done it that way” to “We’ve never done it that way.”.

Instead of suggesting change and avoiding the “we’ve always done it this way” excuse, handlers are often content to go along with the program and not make waves.

And, when bad things happen – when trouble occurs – these same handlers (and some supervisors) wish they had been more active and persistent in their pursuit of change. "We've always done it this way." Of all the things people say in business, this is the one that gets under my skin the most.

Other variations include "this is how the client wants it" and "that's. We’ve always done it that way (part 2) Febru I [recently] wrote about some of the advantages and disadvantages of habits, customs and traditions and suggested that, as well as looking at the bigger issues of the routine interventions that need to be challenged, it may also be beneficial to consider the smaller, everyday areas that.

I thought #1 was "But we've ALWAYS done it that way!" with "NEVER" as #2 and "But my (fill in the relative) gave that to the church!" as #3. Still, I'm one of those who resists change in things like the liturgy.

Change Bible study, the night of choir practice, the Eucharistic prayers, you name it. The 7 most expensive words in business today are: ‘We have always done it that way.’ Catherine DeVrye, Australian Executive Woman of the Year, is a #1 best selling author and global speaker on service quality and change.

This is an extract from her book ‘Hot Lemon & Honey-Reflections for Success in Times of Change. I’ve always found the phrase – “We’ve always done it this way” – annoying. I remember my parents (dad a clergyman, mom a church musician) using it when it came to church music and worship.

Their form was an organ on one side, piano on the other with a choir in robes in the middle. They knew nothing different. How often have you heard the phrase “we’ve always done it this way?” I’ve heard it so many times for whatever reason over the years, that it drives me crazy.

We seem to get caught up in our comfort zone because of the way we’ve always done things – and change disrupts our routine or behavior, or worse yet – what may be possible.

“This is the way we’ve always done it and you are not going to change that.” Yes, they were speaking some truth, the way they had always done it that way, the way Jesus might have served coffee in Jerusalem leading up to the Last Supper, but their truthfulness was accompanied with an ill-will towards others in the room.